Brady Stewart Studio Photographic Images


Image Licensing

During the year, Brady Stewart Studio images were used in a number of historical exhibits, a documentary, books, publications and blogs.  Licensing provides an opportunity to highlight the historical significance, photo composition and quality of the Brady Stewart Archives.  The following are some of the ways the images were used in 2015 and 2016.

The Roosevelts: An Intimate History

Even though the production company has not returned our calls regarding using the image without our permission, the image was an excellent representation of Theodore Roosevelt’s style and demeanor during a speech in Pittsburgh (1917).  More information about the documentary can be found at:  http://www.pbs.org/kenburns/films/the-roosevelts.

1917-TRoosevelt

Teddy Roosevelt stumping for the war effort in Pittsburgh (Oakland) 1917

Brady Stewart photographed Teddy Roosevelt in the Oakland section of Pittsburgh for the Pittsburgh Dispatch.  Brady Stewart was a big supporter of the former President’s progressive ideals.  He had witnessed first hand the extreme wealth and poverty throughout city and surrounding areas.

Heinz History Center:  We Can Do It!  WWII

We had three images in the exhibit including one of my grandfather’s most famous photograph of Pittsburgh’s Shantytown (1932).  The other two images were of my Aunt Sally Stewart supporting the war effort with the local group called the Ground Observer Corps which was under the Government’s Civil Defense program.  More information on the exhibit can be found at the Heinz History Center: http://www.heinzhistorycenter.org/exhibits/we-can-do-it-wwii.

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Pittsburgh’s Shantytown looking south toward the Pennsylvania Railroad’s Union Station – 1932

1942-Civil-Defense

Sally Stewart (center talking with officer) volunteered to promote the Government’s Civil Defense Program; Ground Observer Corps

Heinz History Center:  Strip District History Book

This year is the third reprinting of the museum’s popular book on the history of Pittsburgh’s Strip District.  The museum is using 3 of our popular images in the latest edition; the Gage Building, PA Railroad Yard 1925 and View of the Strip District 1929.  The new edition will be available in the museum’s gift store and online soon.

Liberty Ave and 22nd Street in the Strip District - 1951

Liberty Ave and 22nd Street in Pittsburgh’s Strip District – 1925

 

HACLab Pittsburgh:  Imagining the Modern

We were approached in April 2015 by the Boston-based over, under design firm to participate in Imaging the Modern exhibit at the Carnegie Museum of Art. While doing research, they came across our website and found a number of unique images that supported the exhibit’s narrative.  We provided over 200 images for review and they eventually selected 43 images.  The HACLab; Imagining the Modern is running from September 2015 thru May 2016.  I highly recommend the exhibit, it includes many photographs, documents, maps, video and models of the city’s amazing transformation 1945 to 1970.  More information on the exhibit; http://www.cmoa.org/ExhibitionDetail.aspx?id=25539.

Heinz main entrance

Heinz Architectural Center within the Carnegie Museum of Art

Pat Museum

Patrick Stewart looking at his father, Brady Stewart Jr on a photo shoot in Gateway Center 1957

The timing of the exhibition was special since my oldest son got married at the Carnegie Museum two weeks after it opened.  The wedding and reception were right next to Heinz Architectural Center and friends and family were able to view and take photos of the exhibit.  Photos of the exhibit along with the images used can be viewed at;  http://bradystewartphoto.photoshelter.com/gallery/Heinz-Architectural-Center/G0000P5IPGUTcdFQ/

Virginia Department of Education c/o Educational Testing Service.

We were contacted by the department to license one of our most popular images; View of the Strip District from the Koppers Building.  The VA Department of Education is using the image in the Virginia Standards of Learning program. The program establishes minimum expectations for what students in Virginia should know and be able to do at the end of each grade or course in multiple disciplinary studies, such as, but not limited to: English, Math, Science, Social Science, etc.

1929-Strip District

View of the Pennsylvania Station and Strip District from the new Koppers Building 1929

Fictional Novel about Erie PA

The author; William Martin licensed the Shantytown image for his period novel based in Erie PA.

1931-Shantytown 3035 web copy

Pittsburgh’s Shantytown looking south toward the Pennsylvania Railroad’s Union Station – 1932

Non-Fiction Novel about the 1904 World’s Fair

Author William Mueller selected the image featuring the “Cherokee Chief”, an equestrian statue by James Earle Fraser that was displayed at the 1904 St. Louis World’s Fair.  Brady Stewart attended the 1904 World’s Fair with his brother Clark, sister Helen and mother Alice Brady Stewart.  The negatives were quite grainy and had some damage due to the temperature and humidity in St Louis.

American Indian Statue

St Louis MO: A view of one of the many statues in and around the buildings at the St Louis World’s Fair. The statue celebrates the American Indians of the plains. The statue was located next to the Palace of Education and Social Economy.

Non-Fiction Novel about PA Senator William Flynn

Senator Flynn’s grandson, Jeff Lawrence, is writing a book about his grandfather’s life and relationship with Theodore Roosevelt.  He is using a series of images taken during a Roosevelt speech in the Oakland section of Pittsburgh.  Senator Flynn was in the car with the former President.

1917-TRoosevelt

View of Teddy Roosevelt and Senator William Flynn (with hat on) during a speech in Pittsburgh 1917

UCA of SME Association (Underground Construction Association of the Society of Mining, Metallurgy and Exploration)

The association was developing a “coffee table” book to be distributed to the mining and construction firms to showcase the underground construction and mining across the United States.  They used another popular image on the web site;  view of the Liberty Tunnels construction from the south end.  More information about the group can be found at:  http://www.smenet.org/uca

Pittsburgh's Liberty Tunnels Construction

Pittsburgh’s Liberty Tunnels Construction from the south end

 Pittsburgh Magazine

Columnist Virginia Montanez wrote a very interesting article on the Bicentennial Gateway Amphitheater also known as the Golden Crucible.  The Amphitheater was built-in 1959 to celebrate Pittsburgh’s Bicentennial.  Her article can be viewed at the following address; http://www.pittsburghmagazine.com/Best-of-the-Burgh-Blogs/Pitt-Girl/January-2016/PittGirl-Yikes-Imagine-This-Instead-of-a-Fountain-at-the-Point/.

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View of the Golden Crucible Bicentennial Gateway Amphitheater 1959

Brady Stewart Studio Website

Over the last month, we added 200 images to the web site.  Images were added to galleries Living in Western PA 1950-1960 and 1960-1970.  Images were also added to Bethel Park Sports 1961-1980.

A reminder that you can purchase prints, download and or license images from the web site.  All revenue generated supports the ongoing digitizing of negatives and prints from the archives.  Images can be viewed at http://www.bradystewartphoto.photoshelter.com.  Thank you for your kinds words and continued support.

2015 in review


The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2015 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 8,700 times in 2015. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 3 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

What comprised a Commercial Photography Studio during the 1950’s and 1960’s?


This question has come up occasionally at speaking engagements, from friends or from some of my children’s friends.  What was a commercial photography studio?  Simply put, a commercial photography studio provided professional photographic services to businesses, organizations and individuals. Most commercial studios included a professional photographer or two taking studio and on-location photographs and a lab technician developing and making prints. Brady Stewart Studio was quite different, they offered an extensive line of services geared to advertising agencies, art studios and major corporations.

Brady Stewart Studio display at Ketchum McLeod and Grove offices in the Chamber of Commerce Building

Brady Stewart Studio display at Ketchum McLeod and Grove offices in the Chamber of Commerce Building

The services included; on-location photography, in-studio photography, film processing (negatives and transparencies), black and white & color prints, reproduction of an original print or transparency (copy negative), color, B&W and/or kodalith 35mm, 2 1/4 x 2 1/4 super, 3″x 4″ lantern slides and 8×10 vu-graphs submitted from art and type, print mounting, photostats for advertising layouts, passport and Public Relations photos.

Robert Pavuchak getting ready to trim prints while Brady Stewart Sr is preparing a print for mounting on cardboard.

Robert Pavuchak getting ready to trim prints while Brady Stewart Sr is preparing a print for mounting on cardboard.

An important dynamic that drove the success of the commercial photographers was that 35mm personal cameras did not gain popularity until the mid 1960’s and there were no 1-hour photo labs to process film and make prints. So if you wanted quality photographic services, you went to a professional photographer. During this time, Brady Stewart Studio was the largest commercial photography studio in western Pennsylvania. The studio contracted business from the largest corporations, advertising agencies, architects, art studios, non-profit organization and small businesses throughout the region. A short list of clients included; Ketchum McLeod and Grove Advertising, Lando Advertising, Walker Advertising, W Craig Chambers Advertising, Wasey Ruthranff & Ryan Advertising, Fuller Smith and Ross Advertising, Town Studios, Peter Muller & Munk, the Pennsylvania Railroad, Railway Express (forerunner of the Port Authority), Alcoa, Westinghouse, US Steel Corporation, Calgon, Pittsburgh Coke and Chemical, Swindell Dresser, H.K. Porter, Reed Smith, Shaw and McClay Attorneys, Richardson Gordon Architects, Ingram Boyd and Pratt Architects, Israel Bonds, Pittsburgh Regional Planning Association, Eiben and Irr department store, Andy Gamble Interior Design, Goodwill Industries, Salvation Army and many more.

Brady Stewart Jr. working with an art director to create an acceptable product shot. - 1950

Brady Stewart Jr. working with an art director to create an acceptable product shot. – 1950

Up through the 1960’s, Brady Stewart Studio and other professional photographers primarily used large format cameras for assignments; 2 1/4 x 2 1/4, 4×5 and or 8/10. Based on the assignment and budget, the proper equipment and personnel were chosen to complete the assignment within the required time frame. The studio was designed and staffed to make sure all assignments were completed on time, within budget and with the highest quality,  They earned the reputation as the “go to” studio for complex photographic assignments.  And it helped that Brady Stewart Sr had over 50 years of photography experience in the darkroom and on-location; Brady Stewart Jr over 20 years and the rest of the staff a combined 20+ years of experience.  It was a creative environment where the staff’s input was solicited and valued.

Brady Stewart Jr and Ross Catanza on location at the Library with the 8x10 Deardorff camera - 1957

Brady Stewart Jr and Ross Catanza on location at the Library with the 8×10 Deardorff camera – 1957

I will try to give you a feel for what it was like at Brady Stewart Studio on any given day.  You never knew what was going to come through the door or where the staff photographers would be needed that day. Office hours were 9:00 to 5:00 but staff was always there early and late nearly everyday; mainly due to trying to avoid rush hour traffic.  One needs to remember that there were a lot more people commuting in and out of Pittsburgh during this time. The city population peaked in 1950 (677,000) and the region grew dramatically from 1950 (1.53M) to 1970 (1.85M). Lots of traffic and lots of road improvements during this time.

Sally Stewart answering the phones at Brady Stewart Studio - 1954

Sally Stewart answering the phones at Brady Stewart Studio – 1954

The phone would start ringing at 9:00 with pick ups all over town.  The last person hired would be the messenger boy while learning how to be a photographer’s assistant. Or if you were part of the family and needed money during the summer…  Cathleen Brady Stewart, Brady Stewart III and Michael Stewart were all “messenger boys” during the 1960’s.  Brady Stewart Sr loved to walk around town so he would break in the new messengers, he knew every inch of the city along with where every client was located.

The daily work was laid out for each photographer when they arrived at the office.  Most of the assignment were routine for regular clients but some would require a meeting to discuss the equipment and personnel needed for the job.  There was always a lot of lab work to be done; film processing, contact sheets, copy negatives, black and white prints, head and shoulder shots for PR, and photostats for advertising layouts.  The more professional work was done by Brady Stewart Jr Ross Catanza and Dave VanDeVeer which included; on-location assignments, studio set ups, 35mm slides and display transparencies. Complex location photography at manufacturing plants or at client headquarters was usually set up well in advance through an advertising agency, PR firm or art studio.

Ross Catanza filling out paperwork on his last assignment - 1956

Ross Catanza filling out paperwork on his last assignment – 1956

Then you got the in-day rushes from the advertising agencies and art studios that “had to be done” immediately so they could meet client deadlines.  These happened everyday and would always lead to someone having to work overtime to get them finished.  I must say, it was usually my father that got stuck with most of the overtime and weekend work.  For as long as I can remember, he was rarely home for dinner and always worked weekends… the downside of owning your own business. And having run the business after his death from 1980 to 1991, I usually made dinner, but routinely went back to finish up the work for the next morning.

Brady Stewart Jr finishing up a studio set-up assignment -1959

Brady Stewart Jr finishing up a studio set-up assignment -1959

For the most part, our clients were great to work with and made the long hours bearable.  One of our favorites was renown Pitt professor of Radiology, Dr. Lewis Etter.  He used to come in with human skulls and skeletons to photograph for his landmark books about the skull.  More about Dr. Etter in the next post.  On another day, Dr Stuart from the University of Pittsburgh dental school called in a said she needed a “fresh sample” photographed immediately and she would be at the office in 20 minutes.  Given that she was from the school of dentistry, they thought it would be teeth but were shocked when she arrived with the stomach lining of a cow!

Dr. Lewis Etter's artwork for his book on the Human Skull - 1

Dr. Lewis Etter’s artwork for his book on the Human Skull – 1954

We were contract staff photographers for the Pennsylvania Railroad and Railway Express during the 1950’s and early 1960’s. They each had staff photographers but due to the sheer volume of work, they often needed us to photograph an accident scene or show up for an employee award ceremony.  Both were large employers in Pittsburgh during this time.and gave us a lot of work.

Assignment for Railway Express a truck and trolley accident - 1954

Assignment for Railway Express a truck and trolley accident – 1954

The 1950’s and 1960′ have been called by some the golden age of Pittsburgh Advertising.  There were a large number of quality advertising agencies and art studios throughout the city. After all Pittsburgh was headquarters to a large number of Fortune 500 companies that all needed quality Advertising and Public Relations services.  Depending on the project, the studio either worked directly for the corporation or through their advertising agency  or art studio.

Major Henry Dries at Brady Stewart Studio for PR shot while product photography for American Standard in the background - 1955

Major Henry Dries at Brady Stewart Studio for PR shot while product photography for American Standard in the background – 1955

Every since the start of the business in 1912, Brady Stewart was interested in creating slides for presentations to family, friends and peers.  From 1907 to 1912 he was director of Lantern Slides for the Photographic Section, the Academy of Science and Art of Pittsburgh (today the Pittsburgh Photo Club). He created beautiful hand-colored slides of his travels to Idaho and other favorite scenes from his early life. He carried that passion forward to Brady Stewart Studio where from 1950 to 1991, the studio was best known for creating any kind of slide in any format (35mm-8×10 vu-graphs) and any film type (ektachrome, kodalith, B&W, diazochrome) for any presentation environment.

Brady Stewart and friends camping near Twin Falls Idaho - 1910

Brady Stewart and friends camping near Twin Falls Idaho – 1910

With the advent of television, advertising agencies needed slides formatted to project well on a television screen. The studio created grids to fit inside 35mm. cameras and also added a grid inside a light source to project on the table so the type and graphic fit perfectly within the TV area.  And with the introduction of 35mm Ektachrome film in 1955, the studio’s most consistent work was creating 35mm. color slides of advertising and artwork for client approvals and business presentations.

Duquesne Brewery Company Beer Advertisement - 1967

Duquesne Brewery Company Beer Advertisement – 1967

Brady Stewart Studio offices were located at 725 Liberty Avenue in downtown Pittsburgh from 1952 to 1966.  It was a centralized location to get to most of their larger accounts and easy access in and out-of-town.  My favorite lunch spot around the office were The Brass Rail, Palmer’s Restaurant, and the Atlantic Grill… and we can’t forget DImling’s Candies next door!  There were also good lunch counters at Sun Drugs and G.C. Murphy’s.  The street car (trolley) stopped right out front at Max Azen’s Furs so it was easy for us to get in and out-of-town traveling to the South Hills.  And we got all of our sporting goods right across the street at Eiben and Irr Department Store.  It was a great place to visit and look around at all the new stuff.

Pittsburgh PA:  New Wilson Golf clubs and RCA Color Televisions for sale at Eiben and Irr Department Store - 1958.  Eiben and Irr Jewelry and Department Store operated in downtown Pittsburgh at the corner of Wood Street and Liberty Avenue from 1953-1979.

Pittsburgh PA: New Wilson Golf clubs and RCA Color Televisions for sale at Eiben and Irr Department Store – 1958.

After Brady Stewart passed away in 1965, the studio moved to the Empire Building next to the Jenkins Arcade.  It was a practical move since Ketchum McLeod and Grove had  moved to Gateway Center 4 a few years earlier; they were the studio’s largest account.  The business started to change in the mid-1960’s and a number of the professional photographic services were no longer exclusive to the commercial photographic studio.  There were a lot of new photographers that only shot location photography and used photographic laboratories to process and make prints.  The Kodak Photographic labs took off during the 1960’s due to the dramatic increase in the use of 35mm cameras.  Advertising agencies and art studios purchased their own photostat equipment so a lot of the “steady” work was gone.

Westinghouse Showcase of Televisions - 1968

Westinghouse Showcase of Televisions – 1968

The studio changed with the times and downsized to match the daily workflow.  Ross Catanza joined the Pittsburgh Post Gazette and had a long award-winning career.  Robert Pavuchak joined the Pittsburgh Press and also had a long and award-winning career.  Dave VanDeVeer left in 1968 to open his own successful commercial photography business.  And finally James Garvey left for a new calling, he joined the Catholic Church as a priest.

The Photographers of Brady Stewart Studio; Dave VanDeVeer, James Garvey, Bobby Pavuchak, Ross Catanza

The Photographers of Brady Stewart Studio; Dave VanDeVeer, James Garvey, Bobby Pavuchak, Ross Catanza

For the next 25 years, the focus was on studio photographic services that included; presentation slides and vu-graphs, studio set-up photography, darkroom film services and prints, with some location photography mixed in.  You can view more of the photography work from 1950 to 1970 on the web site; http://bradystewartphoto.photoshelter.com/ (Living in Western Pennsylvania 1950 to 1960 and 1960 to 1970).  We will be digitizing more of the advertising work in the upcoming months.

The New Schlitz Aluminum Softop Beer Can - 1962.

The New Schlitz Aluminum Softop Beer Can – 1962.

A reminder that new images were added to the web site and they can be found at  http://bradystewartphoto.photoshelter.com/gallery-list.  Gallery: Living In Western Pennsylvania 1950 – 1960 AND 1960-1970.  We also created a new Gallery “April 2015 New Images”. And all the images online are for sale and the proceeds are used to digitize and identify more prints and negatives from the archives.

Brady Stewart Studio’s commitment to local charitable organizations


The Pittsburgh Masonic Community

From the early 1900’s, Brady Stewart was involved in local charitable organizations.  Learning from the example set by his parents, Homer Clark and Alice Brady Stewart, Homer Stewart was Cashier for the First National Bank of McKeesport and very prominent in the fraternal circles in Pittsburgh. He was a charter member of the Fort Pitt Lodge, Free and Accepted Masons.

Homer Stewart in his Masonic uniform

Homer Clark Stewart

The masons were very active in the community raising money to help their own members who fell on hard times along with supporting local churches and soup kitchens.  One of the biggest fundraising activities was marching in parades around Pittsburgh.

Masonic Parade mustering on First Avenue in Pittsburgh

Masons assembling on First Avenue for St Patrick’s Day Parade

Brady became involved in local charitable organizations in 1901 (age 19).  He became an officer in the local Methodist Boy’s Brigade of McKeesport; a group that helped young male orphans and troubled youth gain structure and discipline through a military-like organization.  The Boys Brigade was one of the organizations that the Boys Scouts was modeled after.

McKeesport Boys Brigade

McKeesport Boys Brigade

Pittsburgh City Photographer

Brady Stewart began a career as a Pittsburgh City photographer in 1912.  Given the nature of the work, photographing before, during and after photos of public works projects, he did not work everyday.  In order to stay busy and make extra money, he started B.W. Stewart Studio in 1912.  Originally a portrait studio, the business evolved into a commercial photography studio in 1916.

Brady Stewart on location

Brady Stewart on location

During the many years of taking photographs around the city, he saw first hand how poor the living conditions were for many of the residents.  You can view a large portion of his City Photographer’s work on the University of Pittsburgh’s web site “City Photographers Collection”.  http://digital.library.pitt.edu/images/pittsburgh/cityphotographer.html.  During the early part of the Great Depression, he used the camera lens to capture one of his most famous photographs of Shantytown in the strip district.  It was also known as one of the nations’ “Hoovertowns”. named after President Hoover who many blamed for the depression.  The collection of photographs were published in the newspaper and created quite a stir and eventual action to help Father Cox and the residents of Shantytown.

Shantytown in Pittsburgh 1931

Shantytown in Pittsburgh 1931

Brady Stewart Studio Inc.

After World War II, Brady Stewart and Brady Stewart Jr focused on growing the studio into the best in the city.  They hired and trained a young group of photographers who made significant contributions to the business. The group included;  Ross Catanza, Dave VanDeveer, Robert Pavuchak, James Garvey and Carmen Sabatasso.  Ross Catanza later joined the photography staff at the Pittsburgh Post Gazette and was an award-winning photographer,  Dave VanDeveer opened and ran his own successful photography studio, Robert Pavuchak became an award-winning photographer at the Pittsburgh Press, Jim Garvey changed his vocation and became a priest and finally Carmen Sabatasso remain at Brady Stewart Studio until 1991.

The Photographers of Brady Stewart Studio; Dave VanDeVeer, James Garvey, Bobby Pavuchak, Ross Catanza

The Photographers of Brady Stewart Studio; Dave VanDeVeer, James Garvey, Bobby Pavuchak, Ross Catanza

Pittsburgh’s Charitable Organizations

During this time, many local Corporations became actively involved in charitable causes.  The middle class wages were growing and Pittsburgh’s corporations were growing at a tremendous rate. Corporations would routinely assign personnel to help the charities become better organized and more efficient.  Executives would join the boards of local charities to help guide the fundraising and direction of the charity.  And the service sector; Lawyers, Advertising Agencies and Architects were also very involved in helping the organizations raise money and create more awareness.  We helped Attorney C.K. Robinson create a brochure to raise money for the Western Pennsylvania School for the Blind.  Ketchum Advertising was always working on some kind of charitable brochure or mailing.

Western PA School for Blind

Western PA School for Blind

Brady Stewart Sr. and Brigadier Dries of the Salvation Army were long time friends, The Brigadier was a frequent visitor to the studio in his role directing Public Relations and disaster services for the Salvation Army from 1952 to 1968.  The studio provided professional services at no charge to most of the groups and I remember a “special” price list for churches and community organizations.

Brigadier Dries (center) of the Salvation Army and Brady Stewart photographer's, Dave VanDeVeer (left), Ross Catanza (right)

Brigadier Dries (center) of the Salvation Army and Brady Stewart photographer’s, Dave VanDeVeer (left), Ross Catanza (right)

Another significant group that helped support area churches, community organizations and civic projects were the first families of Pittsburgh.  The Mellon, Hillman, Frick, and Heinz families created foundations that provided monies yearly to support a wide range of charitable activities.  The one that was closest to our family was Allegheny Valley School for Exceptional Children.  In 1960, Patricia Hillman Miller and Bob Prince co-founded the school in the Crafton-Ingram section of Pittsburgh.  The School was established to help children with severe disabilities after a local state-run facility closed.  Both Bob Prince and later Myron Cope donated their time and created awareness for the school in many ways.  Bob Prince created the “Green Weenie” as a good luck charm for the Pittsburgh Pirates during the 1966 season.  Prince donated all the profits from the Green Weenie and speaking engagement to the school.  Less than 10 years later, Myron Cope, legendary announcer for the Pittsburgh Steelers, launched the Terrible Towel during the 1975 playoffs.  Myron’s son, who had severe autism, lived at Allegheny Valley School and like Prince donated all profits from the Terrible Towel to the school.  Upon Myron Cope’s death, he turned over the rights to the towel to the school.  Myron Cope also started the annual Vintage Grand Prix; an event in Pittsburgh that continues to benefit the school today.  The school estimates that Bob Prince was directly and indirectly responsible for at least $3M in donations and Myron Cope $4M.

Allegheny Valley School first location in Crafton-Ingram

Allegheny Valley School first location in Crafton-Ingram

Our uncle, Edward J. Zapp started working at the Crafton-Ingram school in 1965, after working 20 years for the State Department in foreign service.  He was ready to settle into a more stable profession.  He loved the work, the children and the overall mission of the school.  Brady Stewart Jr. was also very interested in the school and helped when he could with photographic services.  The concept for the new school in Coraopolis (1972) was to create job centers on the campus to help the young adults learn a trade.  The objective was to help them get a job in the community and to become more self-sufficient. Brady Stewart Jr. built a photographic studio on the campus so students could learn how to take photographs and process and print them.  It was a big success.  Other trade classes included; barber and beauty, sewing, and wood working.

Photographic Darkroom at Allegheny Valley School

Photographic Darkroom at Allegheny Valley School

During the 1970’s, Edward J Zapp was instrumental in establishing and proving the concept of group homes.  The group home was a way to enable young adults with disabilities to live and work in communities versus an institution.  Based on his work, the group home concept has been an overwhelming success.  After our uncle past away, Allegheny Valley School named a facility after him; The Edward J. Zapp Program Center in Coraopolis PA.

Bob Prince and the Pittsburgh Pirates

We added new images to the web site that relate to Bob Prince’s work with charities.  The Pittsburgh Pirates held an annual game with a team from the American League called the HYPO Game (first inter-league games).  The event included an old-timers game along with the baseball game

Roberto Clemente at the 1965 HYPO Game

Roberto Clemente at the 1965 HYPO Game

And we just added a number of images on Goodwill Industries (1966) when Bob Prince, Willie Stargell and other Pittsburgh Pirate players visited the facility.  The visit was in support of creating more awareness and to highlight the benefit of donating goods to Goodwill Industries.

Bob Prince and Willie Stargell at Goodwill Industries

Bob Prince and Willie Stargell at Goodwill Industries

Pittsburgh has a long tradition of giving to the less fortunate.  We remain one of the largest contributors per capita to the United Way Agencies along with many other church-based charity campaigns.  Yes we are biased, there are good people here and the city remains a great place to live and raise a family!

A reminder that new images were added to the web site and they can be found at  http://bradystewartphoto.photoshelter.com/gallery-list.  Gallery: Living In Western Pennsylvania 1960-1970.  And that the images online are for sale and all proceeds are used to digitize and identify more prints and negatives from the archives.

US Steel’s Rhapsody of Steel Exhibition 1962


During the late 1950’s and early 1960’s, the Steel and Aluminum industries were aggressively competing for market share in traditionally strong steel markets; food and beverage cans, automobile parts, household appliances and toys/bicycles.  The two dominant manufacturers, US Steel and ALCOA were both headquartered in Pittsburgh.

During 1962, ALCOA made a big move into the beer can market with the unique “soft top” can.  Soon after, ALCOA can out with an even better solution with the “Pop top” can that was a big success in both the food and  beverage industries.

Softop Beer Can

New Schlitz Soft Top Aluminum Beer Can

Brady Stewart Studio was required to sign a confidentiality agreement before the product was set up and photographed in the studio located at 725 Liberty Avenue in Pittsburgh (Gamble Building).  This was a top-secret product announcement that took the steel industry by surprise.

To respond, US Steel’s New York Advertising agency came up with the idea to create more awareness for “everyday” steel products used by consumers.  They decided to test the idea with the Rhapsody of Steel exhibit at Horne’s Department Store  in downtown Pittsburgh during the Christmas holiday season of 1962.

1962-USSteel-Promo-01 WEB

Steelmark logo on the front of Horne’s Department store on Penn Avenue in Pittsburgh

If you were wondering… yes, this is the very similar to the logo that the Pittsburgh Steelers began using on their helmets in 1962 and still use today. The logo is owned by the American Iron and Steel Institute (AISI) and was introduced in 1960 to help all the American Steel manufacturers market their products more effectively against foreign steel competition and the domestic Aluminum and Plastic manufacturers. The Steelers asked AISI for permission to amend the logo to include the Steelers full name in 1963.  AISI was very happy to do it since the logo would gain even more visibility nationwide, even though the Steelers were not very good and rarely got on television,

The exhibits included many of the consumer uses of steel products;

1962-USSteel-Promo-20 WEB

Store display with steel trucks

And the outside window displays included more, this window display was on Stanwix Street;

US Steel's Rhapsody of Steel Window Display

Window display with large household appliances

Even through the campaign was a success, the Aluminum industry continued to take market share away from Steel due to the increasing cost and overall weight of steel products versus Aluminum.

We added 24 new images from the Rhapsody of Steel opening night exhibit on December 19th 1962,  Brady Stewart Jr and Ross Catanza were assigned to the project with Ross taking the outdoor photographs and Brady Jr the inside,

A reminder that the new images can be found at  http://bradystewartphoto.photoshelter.com/gallery-list.  Gallery: Living In Western Pennsylvania 1960-1970.  And that the images online are for sale and all proceeds are used to digitize and identify more prints and negatives.

2014 in review for the Brady Stewart Collection Blog


The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2014 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

The concert hall at the Sydney Opera House holds 2,700 people. This blog was viewed about 9,000 times in 2014. If it were a concert at Sydney Opera House, it would take about 3 sold-out performances for that many people to see it.

Click here to see the complete report.

Pittsburgh’s Great Renaissance 1950 to 1970


Over the last month, we added 100 new images to the http://bradystewartphoto.photoshelter.com/gallery-list.  Galleries: Living In Western Pennsylvania 1950 to 1960 and 1960 to 1970.

We continue to digitize images for the Living in Western Pennsylvania 1950 – 1960 and 1960 – 1970 galleries.  These images document the biggest changes in the Pittsburgh skyline, a building boom throughout the Pittsburgh area, continued growth in the suburbs and the increase in churches and community organizations to support the growing population.  The following image includes one of Brady Stewart’s favorite clients and good friend, Brigadier Henry Dries of Pittsburgh’s Salvation Army.

Brigadier Dries (center) of the Salvation Army and Brady Stewart photographer's, Dave VanDeVeer (left), Ross Catanza (right)

Brigadier Dries (center) of the Salvation Army and Brady Stewart photographer’s, Dave VanDeVeer (left), Ross Catanza (right)

Brady Stewart Studio, Inc. 1950 – 1970

In 1950, Brady Stewart Studio was the largest commercial photography studio in Pittsburgh.  Brady Stewart, Brady Stewart Jr,. and the photographers below, photographed many parts of Pittsburgh’s Renaissance 1.  The studio worked with major corporations, advertising agencies, art studios, architects, printers, and all types of local businesses  to capture arguable the greatest 20 years of Pittsburgh’s growth in population and infrastructure.  The major construction projects included; the Greater Pittsburgh Airport, Squirrel Hill and Fort Pitt Tunnels, Fort Pitt and Fort Duquesne bridges, Gateway 1,2,3,4, Gateway Towers, Hilton Hotel, Pittsburgh Press building, Civic Arena, crosstown parkway, Westinghouse Building, US Steel Building and connecting the parkway East and West through Pittsburgh.

The Studio employed between 10-15 people during this time with four on-call location photographers; Brady Stewart Jr., Ross Catanza, Dave VanDeVeer and Robert (Bobby) Pavuchak.  Brady Stewart Studio was located in downtown Pittsburgh from 1935 to 1991. First downtown location was at 812 Market Street, during the 1940’s and early 1950’s; 817 Liberty Avenue, during the mid 1950’s and 1960’s; 725 Liberty Avenue, late 1960’s through early 1980’s; 211 Empire Building and after the Empire Building and Jenkins Arcade were demolished for 5th Avenue Place, the studio moved to 227 Fort Pitt Boulevard until 1991.

Ross worked for the studio for over 15 years and went on to a successful and award-winning photographer with the Pittsburgh Post Gazette.

Brady Stewart Photographer Ross Catanza

Brady Stewart Photographer Ross Catanza

Dave VanDeVeer  worked for the studio for over 15 years and went on to establish his own successful Commercial Photography studio in Pittsburgh.

Brady Stewart Photographer Dave VanDeVeer

Brady Stewart Photographer Dave VanDeVeer

Bobby Pavuchak worked for the studio for over 10 years and went on to a successful and award-winning career with the Pittsburgh Press.

Brady Stewart photographer Robert (Bobby) Pavuchak.

Brady Stewart photographer Robert (Bobby) Pavuchak.

The client base of Brady Stewart Studio ranged from the largest corporations and advertising agencies to the smallest mom and pop stores throughout the Pittsburgh area.  The next post will include an in-depth look at Brady Stewart Studio, products offered and clients served.

Pittsburgh’s Gateway Center Construction 1950 – 1953

The cornerstone of Pittsburgh’s Renaissance 1 was the demolition of nearly all the buildings south of Stanwix Street to make room for Gateway Center.  The Gateway Center project started in 1949 and phase I was completed with the opening of Gateway I, II & III in 1953.

Pittsburgh's Gateway Center construction 1951

Pittsburgh’s Gateway Center construction 1952

Brady Stewart started photographing the ever-changing Pittsburgh skyline  in 1904.  Ross Catanza continued the tradition photographing each new addition to the skyline from 1950 to 1965.  Other notable events were the Pittsburgh floods of 1956 and 1959

View of the New One Gateway Center - 1953

We added images of the opening of the Squirrel Hill Tunnels (1953), Fort Pitt and Fort Duquesne Bridges (bridge to nowhere), Greater Pittsburgh Airport, and Mellon Square to http://bradystewartphoto.photoshelter.com/gallery-list.  Galleries: Living In Western Pennsylvania 1950 to 1960 and 1960 to 1970.

Opening of the new Mellon Square in downtown Pittsburgh - 1953

Opening of the new Mellon Square in downtown Pittsburgh – 1953

The Building Boom in the Oakland Section of Pittsburgh 1950 – 1960

Brady Stewart Studio’s relationship with Ingham & Boyd began in the 1931 with Buhl Foundation’s Chatham Village project.  Ingham, Boyd and Pratt became one of the city’s leading architects focusing on local secondary schools, universities and hospitals.  We digitized a number of architectural drawings and renderings of the various PCW proposed buildings.

Ingham, Boyd and Pratt's model of the new Pennsylvania College for Women new campus

Ingham, Boyd and Pratt’s model of the new Pennsylvania College for Women campus

Ingham, Boyd and Pratt was very busy during the 1950’s and 1960’s with a complete redesign of the Pennsylvania College for Women (Chatham University today), new buildings at the University of Pittsburgh, new hospitals in Allegheny and Westmoreland Counties along with new schools in Mt Lebanon.

University of Pittsburgh new Memorial Field House - 1958

University of Pittsburgh new Memorial Field House – 1958

Pittsburgh Community Organizations during the 1950’s and 1960’s

During this period, Pittsburgh small businesses and major corporations were very active in supporting community and faith-based organizations.  Brady Stewart and Brady Stewart Jr were both soft touches when asked to provide photographic services for a good cause.  The following image was used in a brochure to create awareness and raise money for the Western Pennsylvania School for the blind.  The assignment was for local attorney, Charles K. Robinson.

Mrs. Davis and children from the Western PA School for the Blind

Mrs. Davis and children from the Western PA School for the Blind

Charles K. Robinson was also very involved in the Western Pennsylvania Golf Association and the Caddie Scholarship fund.  The Committee under chairman Charles Robinson,created the Caddy scholarship fund in 1941 and awarded their first scholarships in 1951.  Worthy students/caddies at member golf courses were eligible for the annual award.  The program continues to be a successful part of the WPGA’s programs today.

Western Pennsylvania Golf Association's Caddy Scholarship Dinner at the Edgewood Country Club

Western Pennsylvania Golf Association’s Caddy Scholarship Dinner at the Edgewood Country Club

The studio provided photographic services for a number of community organizations including;  Salvation Army, Allegheny Valley School, United Way, Goodwill Industries, Bethel Park Athletic Association and many more.  We also provided services for area church groups including; Pittsburgh Council of Churches, the Pittsburgh Presbytery, the First English Evangelical Lutheran Church and a number of area Catholic churches.  The next group of digitized images will include images of the above mentions community organizations and churches.

A reminder that the 100 new images can be found at  http://bradystewartphoto.photoshelter.com/gallery-list.  Gallery: Living In Western Pennsylvania 1950 – 1960 and 1960 – 1970.  And prints can be purchased from any of the images online. All proceeds are used to digitize and identify more prints and negatives for the collection.

 

Images of Pittsburgh during the 1930’s


Over the last two weeks, we added 120 new images to the http://bradystewartphoto.photoshelter.com/gallery-list.  Gallery: Living In Western Pennsylvania 1900-1910; 1910-1930 & 1930-1950.

We continue to work on digitizing images for the Living in Western Pennsylvania 1930-1950 gallery.  This group documents a cross-section of the city’s existing buildings, new projects and events over the 20 year span;  i.e. views of the city & Oakland buildings, the building of Buhl Planetarium,Chatham Village, the Gulf & Koppers buildings and the great Pittsburgh flood of 1936.

 

Brady Stewart on location

Brady Stewart on location

Due to slow down in city projects in the late 20’s and into the great depression, Brady Stewart started to focus more on generating business for his “sideline” business, Brady Stewart Studio.  To go after more commercial photography work, he needed to invest in a 8″x10″ Dierdorf view camera.  At that time, you were not considered a legitimate commercial photographer if you didn’t use a 8″x10″ view camera.  Through his relationships with George Ketchum of Ketchum Advertising and local architects Ingham and Boyd, he garnered a number of major projects during this time. This article will focus on two projects for the Buhl Foundation and Ingham and Boyd Architects.

The Buhl Foundation

Henry Buhl Jr. was a successful retailer in the city of Allegheny during the late 1800’s and into the 20th century.  He established the Buhl foundation in the name of his wife to provide resources in support of local projects to enhance the lives of Pittsburgh-area residents.  He felt strongly in “giving back” to the community that had made him and his partner Russel Boggs wealthy.  More information about the foundation can be found at http://www.buhlfoundation.org/.

Chatham Village of Pittsburgh

The Buhl Foundation’s first major project was Chatham Village.  Described as the city’s affordable housing for the working class, it was an overwhelming success… and remains so today.  Brady Stewart was contracted to photograph the project renderings and also did some on-site work.

Chatham Village Rendering

Chatham Village Rendering

The development was constructed in 3 phases beginning in 1932 and ending in 1956.  This was a unique project since it was viewed a long-term investment for the Foundation.  They mandated the use of the best available building materials so the houses would be safe, secure and would last well into the future.  And they also offered the prospective residents  two options; ownership or rental.  Below is a progress photograph during construction:

Chatham Village Townhouse

Chatham Village Townhouse

It is hard to imagine today how a project like this was viewed back in 1931.  The city  was in the throes of the great depression (see shantytown photos http://bradystewartphoto.photoshelter.com/gallery/Living-in-Western-Pennsylvania-1930-1949/G0000.rclz4vq7ys/) and the progress that was made during the 1920’s by the middle/working class was slowly fading away.  But in reading about the people behind the Buhl Foundation, the current plight of the working class was the reason they approved the Chatham project.

To view more information on Chatham Village :http://www.livingplaces.com/PA/Allegheny_County/Pittsburgh_City/Chatham_Village_Historic_District.html

Buhl Planetarium

The construction of the Buhl Planetarium was truly one of the great achievements in the city during the depression.  The Buhl Planetarium was built with approximately 1/10th of the Foundation’s available monies ($1.1M).  Once completed, they signed to property over to the city for ongoing management and maintenance.

Buhl Planetarium on the North Side of Pittsburgh

Buhl Planetarium on the North Side of Pittsburgh

The project architects were Ingham and Boyd and they contracted out the renderings to J.A. Mitchell.  They originally proposed three entrance views, the following one was selected but ended up being revised during construction.

Buhl Planetarium Entrance

Buhl Planetarium Entrance

Brady Stewart photographed all the rendering and drawing with his 8″x10″ Dierdorf view camera to ensure the quality of reproduction, clear and concise and no distortion on the outer sides of the drawings.

Buhl Planetarium diagram of the first floor

Buhl Planetarium diagram of the first floor

There is a comprehensive web site on the history of the Buhl Planetarium with lots and lots of information http://buhlplanetarium.tripod.com/.

The Great Pittsburgh Flood of 1936

And one of the most horrific events during the 1930’s in Pittsburgh was the great flood of 1936.  Brady Stewart was out and about during the flood trying to capture the enormity of it.  Here is one of his best photographs of the event.  As most Pittsburgher’s know, there is a mark near the Horne’s clock that shows how high the water reached during the flood.  This photo was used to confirm it!.

The Great Pittsburgh Flood of 1936

The Great Pittsburgh Flood of 1936

The damage was incredible; over 100,000 buildings were destroyed, $250m in damage (6.3 billion in dollars today) , estimated 69 deaths and over 500 injured.   The catastrophe lead to the establishment of locks and dams along the three rivers to prevent this level of damage in the future.

A reminder that the 120 new images can be found at  http://bradystewartphoto.photoshelter.com/gallery-list.  Gallery: Living In Western Pennsylvania 1900-1910, 1910-1930 & 1930-1950.  And prints can be purchased from any of the images online. All proceeds are used to digitize and identify more prints and negatives for the collection.

 

 

Pittsburgh Highways during the 1900s


This week, we added 50 new images to the http://bradystewartphoto.photoshelter.com/gallery-list.  Gallery: Living In Western Pennsylvania 1900-1910.

Pittsburgh to Greensburg Turnpike

The 15 images of Brady Stewart traveling in and around the Greensburg Turnpike are special in many ways.  Brady Stewart had just come through the worst year in his life due to the death of his best friend and younger brother Clark Stewart.  So in 1906, he purchased a new Buick Model F for around $1,300 and began to travel and take photographs all over western Pennsylvania and went to neighboring states to visit friends and relatives.  The specifications for the Buick Model F included; seats 4-5 passengers, 2 cylinder engine, 2-speed manual gearbox, rear wheel drive,  16 gallon fuel tank and roughly 20-25 miles per gallon.  The photo below in Oakland before starting off of one of his trips.

Brady Stewart's new Buick Model F

Brady Stewart’s new Buick Model F

Motoring Clothes for Automobiles

In 1906, there were approximately 79,000 automobiles on the roadways throughout the United States.  Clothing manufacturers saw an opportunity to take advantage of the new craze by developing lines of “Motoring” clothes for men and women.  As you can see from the images, the early cars did not offer much protection from the elements.  For men, there were coats, hats and gloves for driving and for changing a tire.  And let’s not forgot those great goggles that you have seen in the movies. For women, there were stylish motoring coats along with specially designed face veils that covered hats and protected them from the elements.  You can see examples in the photographs included in the blog and on the website  http://bradystewartphoto.photoshelter.com/gallery-list.  Gallery: Living In Western Pennsylvania 1900-1910.

 

Going on a Picnic in the new Buick Model F

Going on a Picnic in the new Buick Model F

Owning and Driving an Automobile in 1906

We have all experienced challenges with our automobiles but I am not sure we can imagine what it was like in 1906.  To start with, there were no paved roads, highways, gas stations, and yes, no AAA outside the major cities.   AAA started in 1901 but did not become nationwide until the 1920’s.  Maps were first published by AAA in 1905 but they were very limited in size and scope.  They started paving roads around 1915, building highways in the 1920’s, and Gulf Oil opened the first “filling station” and sold maps in Pittsburgh in 1913.  In 1906, you purchased gas from a local general store, blacksmith or pharmacy.  Repairing your car could be an adventure depending on the problem;  frame damage needed a qualified blacksmith, engine issues required the dealership and minor issues such as flat tires… you.

Brady Stewart's Car stuck in the mud after a heavy rain

Didn’t listen to Joe Denardo, stuck in the mud

Automobile problems on the Greensburg Turnpike

Automobile problems on the Greensburg Turnpike

And when these problems occurred out in the country… good old horses saved the day!

AAA of Westmoreland County in 1906

AAA of Westmoreland County in 1906

Other Images Added to Living in Western Pennsylvania 1900-1910:

1.)  27 additional images to the 1904 family vacation to Lake Erie, near North East Pennsylvania

2.) 1 additional image to the Wabash Railroad progress photographs

3) 1 image of the 1904 Pittsburgh flood

4) 3 additional images of Highland Park during the winter of 1903

A reminder that the new images can be found at  http://bradystewartphoto.photoshelter.com/gallery-list.  Gallery: Living In Western Pennsylvania 1900-1910.  And that the images online are for sale and all proceeds are used to digitize and identify more prints and negatives.

Pittsburgh Photography 1900-1910


This week, we added 90 new images to the http://bradystewartphoto.photoshelter.com/gallery-list.  Gallery: Living In Western Pennsylvania 1900-1910 and Brady Stewart Studio Archives 1880-1910.

Highland Park Zoo 1903

We found five early images of Highland Park during the winter of 1903.  Two images are of the park including a view of the Highland Park skating rink that was formed when the city created Lake Carnegie from a nearby reservoir.  The skating rink was opened in 1894 thanks to the efforts of Director of Public Works, Edward Bigelow.  The next set of images are a bit depressing given the significant changes made to the Pittsburgh zoo habitat over the last 30 years.  But these are the same images that I remember while visiting the zoo during my childhood.

Lions cuddling at the Highland Park Zoo

Lions cuddling at the Highland Park Zoo

Bear Run Park

The Stewart family visited Stewart Township and Bear Run Park on a number of occasions to visit Alice Brady Stewart’s relatives in Stewart Township (Brady Family).  The following image and six others were taken during the summer of 1905.  Bear Run became famous later in the century when Frank Lloyd Wright built Fallingwater for the Kaufmann family in the 1930s.

 

Stewart visiting their Brady cousins in Stewart Township - Bear Run

Stewarts visiting their Brady cousins in Stewart Township – Bear Run

Pittsburg Pirates 1903

Brady Stewart took this image of the great Honus Wagner at Forbes Field.  Once the negative was processed, he contacted it with another negative to create a positive image of Mr. Wagner.  The final product needed to be an outlined image of the Flying Dutchman for an advertisement in the local Pittsburg paper.  With the background opaque, the printed background would be white so a printer could overlay the copy for the advertisement.  Honus Wagner purposely placed the bat on his left shoulder to see if anyone would notice it (he batted right-handed).

The great Honus Wagner posing with the bat on his left shoulder.

The great Honus Wagner posing with the bat on his left shoulder.

Other Images Added to Living in Western Pennsylvania 1900-1910:

5 Additional images of Brady Stewart’s first major photography assignment for the Wabash Railroad.

3 Additional images of the Stewart’s church trip to Lake Chautauqua New York in 1901.

 

Louisiana Purchase Exposition (also known as the St Louis World’s Fair)

Images can be found in Brady Stewart Studio Archives 1880-1910   http://bradystewartphoto.photoshelter.com/gallery-list… Brady Stewart Studio Archives 1880-1910

Brady Stewart along with his mother Alice Brady Stewart and cousin, Margaret Gray, visited the fair during the fall of 1904.  Through his recent business relationship with the Wabash Railroad, he received discounted tickets and transportation to the fair.  After viewing the photographs and doing some research, I have to say that the Louisiana Purchase Exposition was a spectacular event visited by nearly 20 million people over a 7 month period.  The Exposition featured an abundance of new technologies and innovations including; electricity, automobiles, wireless telegraph, and airplanes.  And new manufacturing approaches for forging steel, mining coal / copper and manufacturing all kinds of consumer goods; shoes, stoves, cardboard boxes and many more.

Brady Stewart took this photo of the Festival Hall at night.  Electricity courtesy of Westinghouse Electric Co.

Brady Stewart took this photo of the Festival Hall at night. Electricity courtesy of Westinghouse Electric Co.

 

Other Images Added to Brady Stewart Studio Archives 1880-1910:

1.)  1 Unique image of the 8th Regiment of Immunes, training at Fort Thomas Kentucky for the Spanish-American War 1898.

2.) 4 images of Theodore Roosevelt’s inauguration day, March 4th, 1905

A reminder that the new images can be found at  http://bradystewartphoto.photoshelter.com/gallery-list.  Gallery: Living In Western Pennsylvania 1900-1910 and Brady Stewart Studio Archives 1880-1910.  And that the images online are for sale and all proceeds are used to digitize and identify more prints and negatives.

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